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     Textile films available for order:

Wool Spinning No. 1

 Starting with a traditional sheep fair we follow the Carr family of Kilcar, Co. Donegal shearing their sheep and spinning the wool. Plants are collected and used for dyeing the wool. Mrs. Carr spins on the Small or Flax wheel & knits a pair of socks for her husband from her own wool. We see Bessie Morrisson from Co. Mayo, the last person to spin on the Big wheel or Tuirne Mor, & Kate Mitchell from Dingle, who spins on the Kerry big wheel.     Made in 1978.

Commentary- Seamus Ó Cathaín; Music- Terry Odlum;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Irish Patchwork - No. 2

Alex Meldrum from Co. Antrim introduces the range of traditional Irish patchworks as seen in collections from the Crafts Council of Ireland in Kilkenny. The Ulster Folk and Transport Museum collection is also shown. The film demonstrates the techniques, materials and methods used in the making of several popular types, including a superb Mosaic patchwork by Lorna Johnson in Co. Wicklow, and a Log Cabin design quilt by Avril Halliday in Co. Down, and others sewn by thrifty women from used flour sacks and old overcoats.     Made in 1981.

Commentary- Conor Mc Anally; Music- Jolyon Jackson;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Irish Lace - No. 3

One of Ireland’s most highly regarded crafts since the 17th century, this film shows the various styles made around the country. In Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan, the home of the famous appliqué lace, we see Marie Cullen at work. Nell Mangan makes Limerick needle-run lace, and Mollie Moore makes crochet lace introduced at the time of the Great Famine in the 1840’s, made by both men and women alike. Fine examples of needlepoint, tatting, sprigging and pillow or bobbin lace, with their attractive glass and bead bobbin endings also feature in this film.     Made in 1983.

Commentary- Mairead Reynolds; Music- Jolyon Jackson;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Irish Embroidery - No. 4

This film covers the history of Irish embroidery, with detailed work sequences and is a sequel to “Irish Lace”, as many techniques are shared. This film shows us the range of Irish needle work. In Mount Charles, Co. Donegal, we meet the last embroidery agent Jack Furey, and in Co. Down visit Thomas Ferguson, who operates a century-old Swiss embroidery machine. Experts demonstrate Ayrshire work, sprigging, & drawn thread work, and examples of Mountmellick work, & 18th. Century sampler making. In Newry’s Convent of Mercy, we see a magnificent altar cloth in embroidered ‘cut-work’, designed by Sister Camillus in the 1920s.     Made in 1989.

Commentary- Linda Ballard; Music- Maurice Roycroft;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Donegal Weavers - No. 5

This evocative film follows the traditional way of life of the three McNelis brothers from Ardara, Co. Donegal. Connal and Jimmy are weavers, outworkers for the well-known woollen mill and shop ‘Magee’s’ of Donegal Town. We see the setting up of the loom, and weaving the fine tweed. John, the third brother, makes wholemeal bread baked in a pot-oven over the open fire, milks the cows, churns butter, and cultivates the shamrock, Ireland's national symbol.     Made in 1980.

Commentary- Ray Mc Anally; Music- Jolyon Jackson; Paddy Glacken & Matt Molloy;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Dublin Woolen Mill - No. 6

Kilmanham Mill is a 150 year old, water-powered woollen mill on the River Camac in Dublin. Here we see textile designer Noirin Pye and her brother John O’Louglin Kennedy, owners of The Weaver’s Shed, preparing wool, dying the fleece, spinning it into yarn, and weaving it on hand looms into a range of fine tweeds in many beautiful colours. The finished fabric is then washed and finished. The mill boasts some extraordinary archaic machinery; it still has a ‘Mule’ for spinning the yarn invented by Crompton in 1779.     Made in 1981.

Commentary- Ray Mc Anally; Music- Jolyon Jackson;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Donegal Carpets - No. 7

Carpets have been made in Killybegs, Co. Donegal since 1899, when Alexander Morton, a Scot, introduced the craft of hand-knotting carpets to Ireland. Famous all over the world, Donegal carpets have found their way to Buckingham Palace, England, government offices in Washington, D.C. and they were also made for the luxury Cunard Liner’s, Queen Elizabeth and Queen Mary. This film covers all aspects of the carpet-making process, including the selection of colours, wool dyeing, mounting of the warp on the huge looms and the skilled hand-knotting and finishing of these magnificent carpets.     Made in 1978.

Commentary- Ray Mc Anally; Music- Michéal Ó Súilleabháin;     Running time - 26 minutes

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Tailor - No. 8

In this fascinating programme we look at the craft and history of Michael Johnson & his son Michael, bespoke tailors in Tullow, Co. Carlow. We follow the making and fitting of a suit using traditional skills which include the measuring, pattern-making, cutting, sewing, and careful fitting of a hand-crafted suit. We see the use of traditional tools such as the Tailor’s Goose, the lapboard and plonker among others. This is a wonderful insight into the once common craft of tailoring.     Made in 1978.

Commentary- Benedict Kiely; Music- Michéal Ó Súilleabháin;     Running time - 26 minutes

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English Silk - No. 9

This hour-long, award-winning* program made in 1985, tells the story of silk production at Lullingston Silk Farm in Dorset, England, makers of the silk for the unforgettable wedding dress of Princess Diana. We see how silkworms are farmed and harvested, and their silk is reeled, spun and woven. At David Evans in Kent, England, the last British company still printing silk by hand, we see the weaving, dyeing, and hand block printing of the silk, including the carving of the blocks. The film concludes with the screenprinting of silk for the famous Libertys store in London.

Commentary- Alec Taylor; Music- Roger Doyle; (*Silver Harp, Ireland’s Golden Harp festival);     Running time - 1 hour

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